Known SPID Formats


Service Profile Identifiers (SPID's) formats have evolved through various stages. The goal of the industry is for the format to become standard everywhere. Well, this is not going to happen for along time, if for no other reason all existing circuits are "grandfathered" with each new evolution of the SPID. There is also a small group that want to do away with the SPID altogether. I have not heard a convincing argument to keep them, but will listen to any valid argument for them if you have one. My favorite theory is a conspiracy theory that ISDN needs to be hard to use to keep us from ordering it. The conspirators are supposedly the Telephone Companies that do not want to be forced to upgrade their infrastructure to support the increased traffic ISDN would generate. I was never impressed with conspiracies, and don't put much credence in this story, but on the other hand, I have never heard a valid argument to keep SPID's from anyone, and recently I did hear several telephone companies complain about ISDN and the Internet causing problems. If this is the case, we may have stumbled onto a major story. Anyway, these tables may help you when trying to work on one of these older installations. As for today and the future, there is now one standard format for the SPID. In the future, there may be no SPID. In the near term, we will see the emergence of autoconfiguration of the SPID into your equipment. Adtran and 3Com already have versions of this feature, and once the standard is set, many types of equipment will have this feature.


There are many grandfathered formats I have found in newsgroups and elsewhere. Also, I have some current information on the state of the are SPID format.


New Standard / Generic SPID Format

The following information was delivered in a presentation given by Garrett Jenkins (NIC Chairperson / BellSouth) October 3, 1996 to the North American ISDN Users' Forum in Gaithersburg, MD.

The new Generic SPID format uses 14 digits, composed of 3 elements

Most applications will use the following format:

NPA NXX XXXX 01 01 (should be entered without spaces)

Each participating LEC will independently implement the Generic SPID format during 1996. Generic SPID format is already implemented by 3 LEC's. Other LEC's are involved in activities to ensure that the Generic SPID format is implemented in 1996. Within a LEC, the change to Generic SPID format will generally be a "flash cut".

Update, June 1997

The current status of the Generic SPID seems to be wide spread acceptance. I have found that the 14 digit format introduced in 1996 has become the norm. In most areas your existing format was grandfathered so as to cause the least amount of service interruption. All new lines seem to be delivered with the Generic format. There is some overlap in some LEC's (like Ameritech) where you can use any 2 digits ranging from "01" to "08" as the TID. This indicates that the LEC does not support TID's. Not a big problem, but disappointing with the shortage of DN's forcing ever new area codes on us.

 

 


Grandfathered SPID Formats
How I use this information: This table contains ISDN formats from older central office software generics. You can determine the Switch type of an undocumented line by checking the SPID format programmed into the CPE. You can also use this table to try to determine the SPID format of a line by trial and error entry.
Switch Type Generic Service Type SPID format Additional notes
AT&T 5ESS 5E7 and below Custom - Point to Point none this type of ISDN service does not use SPID's
AT&T 5ESS 5E7 and below Custom - MultiPoint 01-555-1234-0 lead digit "01" changes to "03" is service is Packet Data
AT&T 5ESS 5E8 Custom - Point to Point none this type of ISDN service does not use SPID's
AT&T 5ESS 5E8 Custom - MultiPoint 01-555-1234-0 lead digit "01" changes to "03" is service is Packet Data
AT&T 5ESS 5E8 National (NI-1) 01-555-1234-011 lead digit "01" changes to "03" is service is Packet Data
AT&T 5ESS 5E9 Custom - Point to Point none this type of ISDN service does not use SPID's
AT&T 5ESS 5E9 Custom - MultiPoint 01-555-1234-0  
AT&T 5ESS 5E9 National (NI-1) 505-555-1234-0111  
Northern Tel DMS-100 BCS34 Custom (NI-1) 505-555-1234-0111  
Northern Tel DMS-100 BCS34 National (NI-1) 505-555-1234-0111  
Siemens EWSD Release 10.5 National (NI-1) 505-555-1234-0111 No custom ISDN available on this switch
         
         

Ameritech:

5ESS-Custom: 01 "7 digit" 0
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-0

5ESS-NI1 (5E8 version software): 01 "7 digit" 011
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-011

5ESS-NI1 (5E9 version software): "10 digit" 0111
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0111

DMS100-NI: "10 digit" 0111
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0111

DMS100-Custom: "10 digit" ?? (??= 0, 1, 01, or 11)
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0

Siemens EWSD-NI1: "10 digit" 0111
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0111


Bell Atlantic:

5ESS-NI1:
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-000

DMS100-NI1:
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-100

Custom ISDN:
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-0


Bell Canada:

DMS100-NI1:
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-1234-00 (7 digit number followed by 2 zero's)


Bell South:

5ESS NI-1
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0100

DMS100: "10 digit" with last two digits repeated
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-123434

DMS100: "10 digit" with last digit repeated
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-12344

DMS100 NI1: "10-digit" 0100
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0100

NI1: "10-digit"-0 (or -00, -000)
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-00
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-000


GTE:

(North Carolina) DMS100 NI1:
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0100
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0000

(Oregon) NI-1 AT&T
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-000
(In this case there was a separate SPID and DN for an ISDN Phone which is not for the ProShare system and will cause an Invalid SPID if entered into the ProShare setup..)

(Oregon) AT&T Custom
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-0
(In this case there was a separate SPID and DN for an ISDN Phone which had no effect if in the ProShare setup.)


Nynex:

5ESS-NI1: (10 digit number followed by 4 zero's)
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0000

DMS100 NI-1: "10-digit" 0001
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0001



Pac Bell:

DMS100: "10 digit" 1 or 2
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-1 (or 10, or 100, or 1000)
example :phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-2 (or 20, or 200, or 2000)

DMS100: "10-digit" 1(for both DN's)
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-1

DMS100: "10-digit" 01 and 02
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-1 (or 01, 0100)
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-2 (or 02, 0200)

*5ESS-Custom - 01 "7 digit" 0
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-0

*5ESS-NI1: 01 "7 digit" 000
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-000

*Note: In either of these configurations a second number may be provided but should not be input into ProShare Video.


Southern New England Telephone:

5ESS-NI1: 01 "7 digit" 000
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-000


SouthWestern Bell:

DMS100: "10 digit" - 01
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-01

Siemens-NI1: "10 digit" - 0100
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-555-1234-0100

5ESS-NI1: 01 "7 digit" 000
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-000
Note: You may need to add 2 zeros to SPID given by SW Bell.


US West:

5ESS-NI1: 01 "7 digit" 000
example: phone #555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-000

5ESS-Custom: 01 "7 digit" 0
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 01-555-1234-0

5ESS NI1: "7 digit" 1111
example: phone # 555-555-1234 SPID: 555-1234-1111



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Saturday, December 22, 2001